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Rowerowa sztafeta, jakiej jeszcze nie było. Dookoła świata!

Bouldering in Caballitos

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Despite adverse weather conditions and a postponed Finals, Anouck Jaubert of France defended her Speed title in Chamonix and Marcin Dzienski of Poland won the second Gold of his IFSC career.
Libor Hroza of the Czech Republic looked strong all day, but the seasoned Speed athlete settled for his third second-place finish this year after a slow start in the final race. Reza Alipourshenazandifar of Iran rounded out the podium after an emotional rebound in the Bronze-medal match against Stanislav Kokorin of Russia.
For the women, Aleksandra Rudzinska slipped in the Gold medal face-off with Jaubert, but the Polish athlete still earned her second medal of the season. Her teammate, Klaudia Buczek, finished just shy of the podium when Anna Tsyganova of Russia posted a flawless final lap.
Discover the complete report, pictures, video replays and highlights on the dedicated event page.
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For the first time, the IFSC World Cup will travel to Villars, Switzerland, for the second Lead and fourth Speed event of the 2016 season.
Villars, Switzerland, is a small village in the heart of the Vaud Alps, only 80 kilometers from the previous World Cup in Chamonix, France. Our talented IFSC athletes will cross the border for a rematch on Friday and Saturday. Speed Finals are scheduled for July 15 at 21:00, and Lead Semi-Finals and Finals for July 16 at 10:00 and 20:00 (GMT+2).
Don't miss the live streaming, and be sure to visit the dedicated event page for further information and event updates.
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Article by Peter Sancianco
We hope you’re having as much fun watching all the episodes of Problems of the SET as we have fun making them. In this edition of “Climbers of Rock Spot,” we sat down with one of our most prolific route setters and YouTube sensation, Danny Howard, to talk about what it’s like to be a route setter, how you can learn to address your climbing weaknesses and how he met #MIGyver!
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Danny announcing the winners at the Boston Boulder Brawl (B3)
What is the most fun aspect of being a route setter in an indoor climbing facility?
At Rock Spot, the most fun aspect of setting is almost always the crew of setters you get to work with. Don’t get me wrong, setting routes is probably the most fun job out there, but it’s tough to do anything for eight or ten hours straight. Having a group of people willing to make stupid jokes through an entire boulder set makes it a lot more entertaining.  
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Danny with Assistant Head Coach for Team Rock Spot - MA and Regional Route Setter, Keith Nadeau
How did you get into climbing and route setting?
I started climbing on a whim in the summer right after high school (2009). Pretty quickly after that I got a job as a floor staff at what was then called RI Rock Gym, and I probably climbed six days a week for the next year. Our previous head route setter let me set my first route around the summer of 2010 I think, and his advice was something along the lines of, “Yea, sometimes it can be cool if you set two holds really close together.. Good luck!” So I stumbled along trying to figure out how to set good routes until MIG was hired shortly afterwards and gave me some actual training. 
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Danny’s first year as a floor staff
What are your favorite kind of routes to set?
My favorites routes to set usually involve some cryptic or unusual sequence that takes a couple of attempts to unlock. Ideally, the problem will seem stupid or infuriating during the first couple attempts until you figure out the ideal sequence, and then it becomes one of your favorite climbs. Of course, most of the time Carlin or one of the other tall climbers in Lincoln will just reach past my intended beta, and I’ll be the one that’s infuriated.
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Danny on Aneroxicist (V7) at Pawtuckaway, NH
Where do you draw inspiration from when you’re setting a boulder problem; or any route for that matter?
When you’re setting regularly, there are going to be times when you’re not immediately inspired, so you figure out ways to force the creative process along. Problems that I’ve climbed or projected outside can be great sources of inspiration, but sometimes it will be something more mundane, like finding an aesthetic line based based on the wall space remaining, and making the route work in that particular area. On occasion we’ll try and emulate another setter (usually Motta or Matty Zane after they moved away), and set a route in their style.
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Danny climbing Twinkie (5.12a) at the Red River Gorge, KY
When you’re not having a good climbing day, how do you divert your attention and unwind?
If I’m not having a good climbing day I usually just sulk about it, but if I’m feeling more positive I might bring my dog Huckleberry for a run, or read a book, or play video games. 
What advice do you have for new climbers who want to eventually send really hard projects?
If you’re a new climber aspiring to “get good” as they say (I might be the only one that says that) you need to figure out what you’re bad at and practice it. I think it’s natural to cling to types of climbing that you excel at, especially when you’re just starting out, but if you’re climbing V4 on overhangs and V2 on crimpy faces it’s going to hinder your progress. Now, how do you figure out your weaknesses as a climber? Funny you should ask. Here at Rock Spot Climbing, I offer a three week, Advanced Climbing Technique course, where you can learn to address your weaknesses, and so much more! Sign up today!
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Danny getting some tips before climbing a trad route at Ragged, CT
Where is your favorite outdoor location to climb and why is it so special to you?
I have to say Lincoln Woods, whether out of convenience as a location, or nostalgia, or to make sure I don’t get excommunicated by the Lincoln Woods Secret Society. Some of the problems are contrived and I wish there was less graffiti, but it was the first climbing area I was introduced too, and I still climb there almost every week, so there must be something to it.
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Danny on Tennessee Thong (V7) at Chattanooga, TN
What do you feel is your biggest accomplishment in climbing?
Oh man, that’s a tough one. I didn’t go insane driving to Chattanooga while my best friend insisted on listening to happy-hardcore for five hours straight (it’s a dance music genre, and it’s really bad.. Look it up). I think my proudest moment was when I sent a climb in the woods called New Dimension (V7). I started working on it way before I was actually strong enough to do it, so because of all the time I put it trying to stick the last two moves I was euphoric when it finally went.
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Danny on the start of Spragesaurous (V5) at Rumney, NH
Do you have any projects you’re working on?
Once it gets a little cooler I’m going to start working on Barbed Wire (V9) in Lincoln woods. I’ve tried it a couple times but I’ve never made much progress, but I think I might be able to get it this season.
Do you see climbing as a major part of your life in the future?
Yea, I’m always baffled when I reconnect with someone I know through climbing and they say something like “I really need to get back into climbing.” I can’t imagine going through a long period of time where I’m not climbing. Probably 90% of my aspirations at the moment revolve around making climbing trips happen.
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Danny as the Co-MC at the Boston Boulder Brawl (#B32016)
How did you meet MIGyver?
Old MIGyver? I can hardly remember a time when I didn’t know him.  And he’s been a real lifesaver. I remember, I was just some young struggling route setter, trying to cut it, setting with the big shots, and he took me under his wing, and muttered something unintelligible, and before I knew it I was setting drivebys and three-hold clusters and double-clutches. Come to think of it, he came along right around the time when Mike got hired.. Hmm. Yea no doubt about it, they both helped me out a ton!
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Danny with Director of Wall Design and Head Route Setter, Mike Dominguez
We hope you enjoyed the interview. There’s still room to sign up for Danny’s Advanced Climbing Technique Course at Rock Spot Climbing - Lincoln on Wednesdays from August 10 until August 24. Classes go from 7pm until 8:30pm and focus on advanced techniques for intermediate climbers. Learn more here:
We’re so excited about our Member Appreciation BBQ at Rock Spot Climbing: Boston-Dedham. To celebrate, we’re having a special giveaway through our YouTube channel for an incredible Rock Spot Climbing prize pack worth $50, featuring a $25 gift card!
Check out our YouTube channel here:
To enter, all you have to do is subscribe to our channel and comment on an episode, letting us know who your favorite route setter is. We just passed 900 subscribers and if we reach 1000 by the BBQ, we’ll choose one of the commenters at random and give them their prize during the BBQ!
For more info on our BBQ, click here:
Peter Sancianco is our Regional Marketing Assistant for Rhode Island
Article by Kim Dallas
This edition of Climbers of Rock Spot features one of the climbers in our most recent Problems of the SET episode, Emily Mischler. Emily is a Rock Spot veteran who is also on the competitive climbing team that practices at our Boston-Dedham location. We sat down with her to learn a little more about her experience on Team Rock Spot.
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How old were you when you started climbing? Were you hooked right away?
I was about 10 years old when I started climbing at Rock Spot. I had been climbing trees for as long as I can remember, so when my mom saw an ad for Rock Spot somewhere, she thought I’d love it. I was definitely hooked right away! I started in the youth program classes and worked my way up to Team Rock Spot.
You read my mind, I was just going to ask about Team Rock Spot! How did you get into competing?
After about two years in youth program classes, I got moved up to pre-team and started to learn about competitions. My pre-team coach, Matty Zane, encouraged me to compete at The Showdown in 2013, so I gave it a try. I was the youngest person there by about ten years, knew no one except Matty, and came in second-to-last, but I loved it! A few months later, I moved up to team and started competing regularly.
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Tell us a little about what being on Team Rock Spot is like…how often do you train/compete?
Team Rock Spot practices Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. On Monday and Wednesday, we climb for three hours. Friday practices are a little more informal, and we only practice for two hours. Our training varies a lot depending on whether it’s

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or sport season. We usually attend anywhere from 2-5 local competitions a season as a team. These local comps are very laid back and fun. Most of the team attends Regionals, and those who qualify go to Divisionals and Nationals.
What’s the best thing about being on Team Rock Spot?
The best thing about being on Team Rock Spot is definitely the people. The coaches and the kids are just fun to be around. We like to climb and train hard, but we all want to have a good time doing it.
Do you have any pre-comp rituals or superstitions?
I don’t really have any superstitions about competitions. One thing I usually do the night before a competition is eat pasta. I used to swim, and my coach would always tell us to eat pasta the night before a meet, so I carried that over into climbing. Right before climbing in a comp I like to do some dynamic movements, like dynos or deadpoints, or my personal favorite, wacky jacks.
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You’re going into your senior year of high school. Do you have plans to continue climbing after you graduate?
Of course! I’ve been researching colleges this summer, and one of the first things I look for is if they have a climbing club of some sort. I plan to do CCS in college, which is basically USA Climbing youth comps, but for college students.
Do you have any long-term climbing goals?
My goal for this fall is to qualify for

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nationals. I’ve never gone before, and since this will be my last season on Team Rock Spot, I’d really like to. Nationals are in Salt Lake City this year, so I also want to go for the skiing!
Besides climbing, what else do you like to do for fun?
Besides climbing, I’m the captain of my high school softball team. I like to ski and swim. I love reading when it’s not school-related. I also like to slackline, but I’m really bad at it!
If you could climb with anyone in the world, who would it be?
If I could climb with anyone in the world, I would climb with either Alex Johnson or Sasha Digiulian. Alex just seems like she would be a really cool person to hang out with, and her dog is adorable! Sasha recently graduated from Columbia, and I really respect her for juggling school and a professional climbing career. I met Sasha once at The Heist, an all-female

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comp, and she was such a nice person!
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See Emily in action in this episode of Problems of the SET! https://youtu.be/d_cOyW8Ww9k
Learn more about our Youth Programs by visiting:
I am inspired by what I’ve read from your site! I live in Alaska and am getting a degree in resource management, but all I really want from life is to live simply with my two dogs, Rin and Rico, husky and lab. I started climbing my freshman year of college and I love it! I also enjoy biking, hiking, and everything outdoors.
My question is also a concern. I really love climbing, but I have also had a lot of trouble with injuries. Two years ago I went on a bike tour from Alaska to Bishop, California, to go rock climbing. The summer before the trip I tore a muscle in my shoulder that did not heal quite right. It continued to bother me while I climbed and caused me to leave Bishop early. When I returned to Alaska a few months later, I was climbing in the gym and my wrist began to bug me. That was the start of a year long ordeal with tendon problems. I have since healed to the point that I can now climb frequently, but I am afraid of re-injury. Have you ever been injured? Do you have a method for dealing with injuries? Do you have things that you do everyday to prevent injury?
Thank you for taking the time to talk with me
Sincerely,
Lin
Hi Lin (and Rin and Rico),
Thanks for writing! I have never been injured climbing, but when I was in my twenties and started climbing in gyms, I would feel some soreness around my ring fingers that made me nervous. I think there are a few prevention things you can do–first and foremost is hydration. If you wake up and start your day with coffee and then drink when you feel thirsty, you will not be super-hydrated. I don’t drink coffee every morning anymore, but when I did I would always make a double-size cup of ginger tea at the same time I made a small cup of coffee, and follow the coffee with the whole cup of herbal tea. Coffee is a diuretic, so if you chase it with twice as much liquid, I think you cover your bases. As the day goes on, you need to pound water even if you don’t feel thirsty. Usually when you feel thirsty, you’re already dehydrated. Staying on top of hydration is going to make your tendons, tissues and muscles very happy, and I think it’s really helpful for injury prevention. Sometimes I call hydration a full-time job–and if you’re exercising (like riding a bike from Alaska to California), it really is going to be a full-time job because you need even more water to be ultra hydrated.
Also, take warming up very seriously. I’ve noticed in France that climbers will warm up for a really long time, sometimes hours! Often we show up somewhere without much time and we want to charge right in and start crushing. In a really ideal world, you’d climb a pitch that’s very easy for you, just to start moving your joints and breathing, and maybe even 2 like this. Then you’d climb something a little harder, where you have to engage your fingers and muscles a little and use your brain, but not get pumped at all (maybe even 2 like this). Then you’d climb something that gets you a little pumped. Then you’d climb something that gets you very pumped, but not hard enough that you’re maxing out to finish the pitch. At that point, you can get on things that are harder for you. Not every crag is set up with enough selection of routes to let you do this, and you don’t always have enough time either. If you’re climbing at a place where there aren’t great warmup options, start by

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around at the base or see if you can find a way to get some topropes or go bolt-to-bolt on a route. You want to hang at the very first sign of pulling too hard during the warmup process. Sometimes people don’t want to hang for whatever reason, but if you push too hard too fast you’ll either get too pumped and not be able to keep climbing much more, or risk injury. I have a friend who keeps Therabands in his pack, and he always does shoulder exercises before climbing at all (you can usually buy these at Walmart). There’s also Awesome Woody’s, a great portable hangboard that can hang from a single clip point, and this can offer some great warmup possibilities too.
If you feel like you’re in a phase where injury is a potential, dial it way back when you go climbing. A friend of mine who was a European world champion told me that when she’s starting back into climbing after injury or a break, she will climb nothing harder than her stretching/warmup grade when she goes climbing, and she does that sometimes for up to a month before she will get on anything that she has to really try on.
Last but not least, make friends with yoga. Even the simplest downward dog stretch is doing way more than it seems like for your fingers, forearms, hands, shoulders and ankles. Just give it a few minutes a day. Even if all you do are some sun salutations, you’ll be increasing your chances of keeping everything open and resilient.
www.boulderingonline.pl Rock climbing and bouldering pictures and news 🙂 Steph
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Domen Skofic returned to strong form, and Slovenian teammate Janja Garnbret won her first World Cup Gold. 
Power-endurance defined the taxing 45- degree Lead Finals routes. For the Men, Gautier Supper of France pleased his home crowd by sticking the blank volume on the less-steep concluding panel, but the final three climbers followed in kind. Veteran Jakob Schubert of Austria claimed Bronze in a countback to Semi-Finals, and Stefano Ghisolfi of Italy of Italy attempted one move more for second place. Only twenty-two-year-old Skofic touched the blue slopers beyond the volume for his second World Cup Gold. 
For the women, Magdalena Rock of Austria was the first female to reach the yellow slopers on the top panel, but again the final three climbers surprised. Anak Verhoeven of Belgium calmly clipped the chains at the Top, but seventeen-year-old Garnbret snatched the Gold with a Top of her own. Veteran Jain Kim of Korea rounded out the podium with a fall just before the final move
Discover the complete report, pictures, video replays and highlights on the dedicated event page.
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