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Great rock climbing locations

Essential Rock Climbing Equipment

Essential Rock Climbing Equipment

When rock climbing it is important that you have the essential rock climbing equipment to help you avoid accidents and harm to yourself. Gear that is absolutely critical for you to have before making your climb are helmets, a harness and climbing shoes. Although there are many other Essential Rock Climbing Equipmentpieces of equipment and safety gear that is mandatory for climbing, these are a few of the most important pieces it takes to make your climb safe.

Helmets

When you are rock climbing you are faced with terrain that could possibly have falling rocks or branches. By wearing a helmet you are able to protect your head from being hit by any of these falling objects. Although the initial contact from the object will give your body a small jolt, you will have saved yourself from sustaining any serious injuries.

Harness

A harness is what connects you to your safety rope and allows you to hang your equipment that you will need throughout your climb. Without a harness you are simply out in the open for the worst case scenario. One small slip could land you at the bottom of the cliff you are climbing. By wearing a harness you will greatly decrease your chances of that happening.

Rock Climbing Shoes

Rock climbing shoes help you to balance on small edges and grip firmly to the rock you are climbing. Without them you will find it harder to push up on edges of the cliff and you could possibly sustain an injury from not wearing the correct attire. These shoes are one of the most essential rock climbing equipment pieces that you will need on your adventure.

 

PITON A5 steel piton (Climbing Equipment )
$7.67
End Date: Wednesday Aug-10-2016 3:45:09 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $7.67
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Singing Rock PULLEY EXTRA ROLL (Climbing,Rope Access Equipment )
$46.67
End Date: Wednesday Aug-10-2016 3:50:18 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $46.67
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Read more http://www.bittersweetclimbing.com/rock-climbing/essential-rock-climbing-equipment.html

Practical Climbing Chalk Bucket Front

Practical Climbing Chalk Bucket Giveaway

Nothing dries sweaty hands better than a free chalk bucket (shown above). I have a similar model, which you can read about in this product review, and let me tell you: You definitely want this. I love mine.

Read on to find out how to win.


Practical Climbing Chalk Bucket Back Not only is the one I am giving away free (thanks to Practical Climbing) all their bags are top-shelf quality, made in the USA, and are handcrafted by a company that supports the climbing community.

Make This Chalk Bucket Yours! Here Is How:

  1. Visit Practical Climbing’s website.
  2. Pick your favorite color/model of chalk bag or bucket.
  3. Share the name of your favorite in the comments of the giveaway post on Facebook here.
  4. Not into Facebook or want to double your chances of winning? Just post your favorite in the comments below. Make sure you are registered to the site so you can be contacted if you win.

Good luck! Winner will be selected next week. Be sure a subscribe to this site for future giveaways and the always-free home climbing wall content delivered to your inbox.

 

The post Free Practical Climbing Chalk Bucket Up For Grabs appeared first on Home Rock Climbing Walls.

Read more http://homerockclimbingwalls.com/free-practical-climbing-chalk-bucket-grabs/

Gearing Up for Rock Climbing

Gearing Up for Rock Climbing

Have you ever wanted to start rock climbing, but weren't sure where to begin? The most important first step to take is to attend a good rock climbing class to teach you the basics. After you get the basics down you will want to start investing in gear to help you rock climb safely. Gearing up Gearing Up for Rock Climbingfor rock climbing doesn't have to be expensive in order to be safe.

The first piece of gear you will want to invest in is a good pair of climbing shoes. Which type you will choose is dependent on if you climb indoors or outdoors. A good guideline is to pick shoes that fit closely, and should be made to grip the rock. A helmet is a piece that is also necessary if you are gearing up for rock climbing. A climbing rope is an essential piece of gear as well. A good tip is to make sure that the rope is UIAA-rated.

Another important piece for gearing up for rock climbing is a harness designed for rock climbing. While you are rock climbing you will want to wear comfortable clothing, and your harness should fit well over your clothing. Along with the harness, you will want to purchase carabiners and a belay device to control the rope and prevent falls.

Choosing rock climbing gear doesn't have to be complicated. The key is to choose gear that is safety rated and fits your needs. Follow these basic steps for gear and have fun rock climbing.

 

Outdoor Rock Climbing Arborist Rope Grab Protecta Equipment For 9-12mm Rope
$18.44
End Date: Tuesday Aug-23-2016 9:53:42 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $18.44
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15KN SAFETY ROCK CLIMBING TREE 9MM-12MM ROPE GRAB PROTECTA EQUIPMENT GEAR
$20.85
End Date: Tuesday Aug-23-2016 19:25:29 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $20.85
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25KN Rock Climbing Screw Locking Carabiner Gear Rappel Rescue Equipment Gear
$11.72
End Date: Tuesday Sep-6-2016 21:05:22 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $11.72
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Aluminum Rock Climbing ATC Belay Rope Rappel Device Safety Descend Equip NEW
$7.43
End Date: Saturday Aug-13-2016 21:10:08 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $7.43
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Read more http://www.bittersweetclimbing.com/rock-climbing/gearing-up-for-rock-climbing.html

PC110555header

Grandes Jorasses - Hypercouloir

Walking in at sunrise, Grandes Jorasses in the distance

So what time do we get up tomorrow?” I wonder how many times I’ve had this discussion with Will, “up at 4 and off by 5?” came the reply- we’ve never made it out from a mountain bivouac in under an hour and a half, never mind, we both ignore the truth and 4 it was. There was no hurry after all, the Hypercouloir of the Grandes Jorasses lay not far above us, and we’d be enjoying the relative luxury of ice climbing in the sun the next day. The mind seemed to be a bit more accepting of a day on a sunny south side, rather than on a cold north face.

Its been a tricky autumn season this year, but a fair payback for the exceptionally good one we had last year so there’s a flip side to every coin. Apart from a few climbs up high since I came back from Pakistan I haven’t really had my eyes set on anything big, I was tired by the end of this year and the mountains of Chamonix weren’t calling me. Every day we got closer to winter was a brutal personal realisation that the summer warmth and longer days are more appealing than the horror show that is winter alpinism.

Nevertheless the best laid plans are hatched over dinner and wine, and whilst I complained about the upcoming weather forecast Will pointed out that we were just using it as excuse because we couldn’t be assed, and we both knew it. That was the meat of it really, there was nothing up high that got me excited enough to want to go and get cold and suffer. But sometimes the winter psyche has to be jump-started and ‘not being assed’ wasn’t a good enough excuse: “I’ve got an alpine objective for us, Hypercouloir on the S side of the Jorasses. We could leave tomorrow?” I texted, and a few hours later a very psyched Will was on the phone.

Grandes Jorasses - HypercouloirLight and fast approach skis, though not that fast when you’re carrying themGrandes Jorasses - HypercouloirWeaving our way up the approach glacier
Grandes Jorasses - Hypercouloir

Trying to find a bivouac spot

Our bivy for the nightOur bivy for the nightGrandes Jorasses - HypercouloirSunset at 4.30pm, winter days are short!

The appeal of the Hypercouloir was in the adventure- it’s a south facing ice line and we had no idea if it would be in or not, seeing as there has been very little precipitation this autumn and very warm temperatures. But there’s definitely something special about going in blind; no tracks, no idea of conditions, or what kind of a rack to bring. No preconceptions about how it’s going to be or if it would even be climbable.

At 4am the alarm went off, the usual awkward morning bivy ritual begun and an hour and half later we were on our way picking a line through a rocky buttress towards our route. A battery failure left us with just one working head torch under a moon-less night so the going was slow, but there wasn’t anything to stress about. Daybreak revealed a perfectly clear sky all around, the lights of Courmayeur coming on one by one announcing a new day, but we were alone up on the mountain and that’s quite a rare thing, something to be savoured and enjoyed. Part of the adventure.

Day breakDay breakGrandes Jorasses - HypercouloirHeading in to the Hypercouloir as spindrift pours down it
Grandes Jorasses - Hypercouloir
Grandes Jorasses - HypercouloirHappy in the sunshineHappy in the sunshine

The light drifted its way down the wall above to meet us, sending huge plumes of spindrift along the line with it- it was windy up above and we were going to spend a day getting very wet by the looks of things. I was on a high though, I’d been up the night before thinking about shooting steep waterfall ice in the mountains at sunrise with heavy spindfrit all around- it had just snowed and I’d allowed myself to dream up this shot. As a near constant stream of snow flowed down the gully things weren’t looking great for Will as he racked up but they were looking great for my camera. The ice was hollow, brown, and rotten. The rock pro was sparse to non-existent at times making the first ice of the season a pretty full on affair and I was glad when Will ploughed his way up the first pitch of sunbaked 90 degree ice.

Grandes Jorasses - Hypercouloir

One of my new favourite shots just for originality

Will on the first pitch

Will on the first pitch

Will on the first pitch

Will on the first pitch

Will on the first pitch

Will on the first pitch

Grandes Jorasses - Hypercouloir

Trying to avoid the horror-ice by heading up the rock

Grandes Jorasses - Hypercouloir
Grandes Jorasses - Hypercouloir
Grandes Jorasses - Hypercouloir

The third and final pitch of awkward ice, © Will Sim

Grandes Jorasses - Hypercouloir

Good ice finally on the last pitch, © Will Sim

Hours later as we topped out of the route on to the plateau beneath Pointe Walker it felt like we’d made the right call in coming- the route had been worthy of the same reputation that some of the classics on the North Face get and here we were taking in the view in the early afternoon sunshine. Above lay a very wind blown summit but with only a few hours of daylight left and one working head torch we decided to play the safety card and rap the line whilst we still had the light on our side.

Grandes Jorasses - Hypercouloir

Will topping out from the Hypercouloir, Mont Blanc in the background

Strong winds at the top

Strong winds at the top

Grandes Jorasses - Hypercouloir

The last purple rays of the day melted away us as we neared our bivy, narrowly avoiding an eerily quiet serac fall that billowed across our path only a few minutes ahead of us. Back at the tent there was only one thing to do, head back to Courmayeur for some well earned food and rest.

Grandes Jorasses - Hypercouloir

Looking down at Courmayeur and the pizzeria far below

Grandes Jorasses - Hypercouloir

Descending down at sunset, Courmayeur lights far below

Read more http://alpineexposures.com/euro/grandes-jorasses-hypercouloir

Great rock climbing locations

Great rock climbing locations

The Rai Leh is perhaps the best rock climbing locations in the entire world. It is located on the Andaman coast of Thailand. Rai Leh features over 700 routes up sheer limestone rocks jetting out of the sea. Climbers need to be aware that because the rocks are limestone this is a difficult climb Great rock climbing locationswith the steel bolts of questionable integrity. Climbers will find places to eat plentiful and nice bamboo bungalows to sleep in.

Expert climbers will also enjoy the challenge of Cerro Torre in Argentina. Cerro Torre is located in Parque Nacional Los Glaciares. Climbers need to be prepared for quickly changing weather. The challenge of this climb is to reach the top of the long pointed mountain. Climbers will need to register with the National Park Service in El Chalten.

The south tower of Torres del Paine in Chile is another awesome rock climbing locations. The climb up this eastern spur of the Andes is breathtaking. Climbers must provide the National Park service with the full names of all climbers. The most popular climb is the five day W route. Climbers are reminded that they must stay on the designated paths.

Another outstanding climb is Mount Roraima in Venezuela. While many tours go up the La Rampa route, those looking for a more challenging trip should attempt the sandstone north side of Mount Roraima. Mount Roraima has the world’s most diverse population of moss. The climber will enjoy reaching the large plateau with numerous oddly shaped rocks.

 

50L Backpack Climbing Travel Waterproof Hiking Internal Frame Packs Rucksack New
$35.79
End Date: Thursday Aug-18-2016 1:22:04 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $35.79
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New 25L Hiking Cycling Backpack OutdoorBag Climbing Travel Shoulders Rucksack
$19.99
End Date: Wednesday Aug-10-2016 23:36:58 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $19.99
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Read more http://www.bittersweetclimbing.com/rock-climbing/great-rock-climbing-locations.html

 

It took Brent Barghahn’s easy to follow video tutorial on making climbing holds to get me to put down my climbing-wall hammer and post for the first time in too many months. I’ve been intensely focused on building first a large shed and then a sizable home climbing wall inside it. The project is about 5% shy of completion at which point I’ll have loads of new climbing wall build content to post, but first I have to take a break to share this great video.

It isn’t that Brent is sharing something new or secret in this ten minute video, most of the content can be found on any of several other websites, it is how simple he makes it all seem and with intoxicating enthusiasm. After my third time watching it I blacked out and came to at a craft store holding several blocks of floral foam and smelling strongly of home decor and potpourri. My first hold is already carved and ready for casting.

Of course there are many ways to make your own climbing holds and debating methods and materials is a hobby for some in itself, but what Brent has created is a solid starting point towards making respectable climbing holds with materials that are easily obtained. Thanks for sharing Brent.

Note: In the YouTube video’s comments is it suggested that only Type I silicone and not Type II will set up properly. The soap must also supposedly contain glycerine for it to work. Dawn Ultra Blue is suggested in the same comments. Good luck!

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The post How to Make Climbing Holds with Brent Barghahn appeared first on Home Rock Climbing Walls.

Read more http://homerockclimbingwalls.com/how-to-make-climbing-holds-with-brent-barghahn/

Brouillard-Pano 2

About the only thing that’s guaranteed for me in Himalayan climbing is that at the end of it all I get to press my face up against a cold aircraft window, like a kid on their first flight, as we fly right over the Mont Blanc massif into Geneva airport. It’s a special moment for me, and I always have a huge grin on my face as I take it all in. On the left side of the plane you see the main core of the Mont Blanc massif, and on the right you fly directly over the North Face of the Grandes Jorasses and Aiguille Verte. Either way you win. I can even see my apartment from up there, a physical reminder of my family, friends and the mountains that I call home. The last few expeditions I’ve always sat on the left side, staring out at the Brouillard Ridge Integral trying to second guess the conditions on this immense route from 30,000 feet. Its always seemed like the perfect solo after a high altitude trip- something about being very acclimatised and fit, but weak on your arms, fitted the route really well. That and the fact that for some reason I’m insanely psyched for alpine climbing in the week following a trip - probably linked to the fact that Himalayan climbing is just one massive planned failure (or it generally is for me anyway).

My flight back from Nepal this May coincided with one of the snowiest Spring season’s in the Alps for a long time, adding an austere look to the route. More winter than summer, the ridge itself looked massive. Often overlooked by its more famous neighbour, the Peuterey Integral, it is no push over seeing as the climb starts quite literally at the valley floor and covers something like 4000m of climbing over 9km of ridges ranging in quality from ‘shit-eating-grin’ scrambling to ‘loose-as-f*ck’ death choss, which I guess makes it an ‘alpine’ route. Objectively the safest way up Mont Blanc, it felt like the perfect post-expedition solo. Ego-fuelled ambitions aside though, long term enchainment partner Ally Swinton was leaving for the summer and it felt only right to send him packing loathing the Alps so he wouldn’t miss it- and what better way to send someone off to the relative flat lands of Wales than single pushing one of the biggest routes in Europe?

The line of the Brouillard Ridge Integral

The line of the Brouillard Ridge Integral

Ally tries to see what he can steal from me

Ally tries to see what he can steal from me

Mont Blanc - Brouillard Ridge Integral Singlepush

The pack and its contents, better move fast then!

The plan was simple, get up early and keep going. The conditions would be tough, we knew that, there was a huge amount of snow still above 3000m but we were undecided whether that would be a hindrance or an aid. In any case it didn’t matter as it’s not a route you can easily escape from so either we’d be trudging up deep snow or running our way up refrozen nevée. Either way we’d be pretty calorie starved by the summit and that seemed to be the point of the whole exercise.

At midnight the alarm went off, at 1am we were on our way. People were still up in the campsite next to us in Val Veney and it does make you question your life choices sometimes. The approach to the Brouillard doesn’t exist, and after walking through a bog, a quick go at catching some wild trout, and a lot of boulder hopping across some angry looking glacial runoffs we finally arrived at the base of the route. It had only taken us 5 times longer than we had planned, but that would be the theme of the route so at least it started off as it planned on finishing.

Heading up the steep grassy access slopes we settled in to our normal early morning routine of team shit-chat, Ally’s training to be a guide, I’m training to be a dad. Running shoes made light work of the Aiguilles Rouges, scrambling over exposed terrain with backdrops of the Peuterey Integral and Mont Blanc far ahead. For some reason it didn’t look too far, maybe it was the euphoria of the dawn glow and following sunrise or the fact that we were really flying up this ridge line, both lost in our thoughts soloing up this massive route.

Sunrise over the Aiguilles Rouges

Sunrise over the Aiguilles Rouges

Mont Blanc - Brouillard Ridge Integral Singlepush

Ally on the Aiguilles Rouges at sunrise with Mont Blanc in the background

Mont Blanc - Brouillard Ridge Integral Singlepush

Ally takes in the sunrise over the Peuterey Integral from the Aiguilles Rouges du Brouillard

Mont Blanc - Brouillard Ridge Integral Singlepush

Ally takes in the sunrise over the Peuterey Integral from the Aiguilles Rouges du Brouillard

Mont Blanc - Brouillard Ridge Integral Singlepush

Fun, fast, ridge scrambling on the Aiguilles Rouges at sunrise

The mountain always gets her way though and as we neared the 3000m mark we hit the snow line- this was the great unknown. In ideal circumstances we would have waited a couple more weeks for the route to clear but then Ally would be in Wales. It was disappointing. So disappointing in fact, that we spent a fair part of the route wading up to our armpits at times digging a channel up this sodden snow. The hours passed by, we slowed to a crawl but at least we were still crawling. As the ridge line grew narrower we were forced to deal with dangerously heavy cornices and really take our time - I managed to break three of them off. But we still had plenty of daylight left and whilst we were on a ridge at least we didn’t have any worry about objective dangers falling on our heads.

That was until we joined the Col Emile Rey.

Above the col lay the ‘easy’ 4b pitch, ostensibly the crux of the route, which had now formed as a thin veneer of delaminated nevée with a waterfall running over it. Luckily for me I’d been doing my best to plough a track up the snow and break off as many cornices as I could for the last few hours so it was Ally’s turn to take over the lead. An initial foray in to the waterfall, fuelled by the unhelpful “Go on you can do it” from the belayer, led to a very wet and angry Scotsman - Plan B it was then, not that we had one. Thankfully a steep but good quality ice pitch to the side led us up to easier, but again very insecure snowy ground, and finally up never ending snow slopes to the Pointe Louis Amédée. Head down I just followed the fresh boot-track as Ally’s feet of fury snaked their way up to an out of sight ridge line far above.

Mont Blanc - Brouillard Ridge Integral Singlepush
Mont Blanc - Brouillard Ridge Integral Singlepush

Exposed climbing, best not to let go at this point

Route finding low down, © Ally Swinton

Route finding low down, © Ally Swinton

Mont Blanc - Brouillard Ridge Integral Singlepush

Exposed climbing, best not to let go at this point

Surprisingly good snow at the start for 100m

Surprisingly good snow at the start for 100m

Mont Blanc - Brouillard Ridge Integral Singlepush

Wild backdrops but wary of the huge cornices everywhere now

Mont Blanc - Brouillard Ridge Integral Singlepush

Higher up the snow alternated thinking we may have finally hit the refreeze line only to sink up to our waist at times

Looking back at Pointe Baretti

Looking back at Pointe Baretti

Mont Blanc - Brouillard Ridge Integral Singlepush
Mont Blanc - Brouillard Ridge Integral Singlepush
Mont Blanc - Brouillard Ridge Integral Singlepush

Ally tried to avoid the waterfall pitch on the right

Mont Blanc - Brouillard Ridge Integral Singlepush

Ally works his way up around the waterfall pitch

The end was finally in sight, but still not in the bag. We were both soaking wet and it had been a real concern over the last few hours that time was now our enemy - if we topped out after sunset frostbite from our wet boots was a real possibility. The wind picked up, the temperatures dropped and we both regressed back in to our own little worlds as we simul climbed to the summit. The colours intensified signalling the last of the day’s heat and the wind bit at any exposed skin, it’s an acquired art wiggling all your toes at the same time as climbing. As we neared the final slope to the summit proper the wind reached its zenith, too close to a gale for my liking, keenly aware how serious single pushing big objectives can be - if we would have had to stop for more than a few minutes hypothermia would not have been far away. Light isn’t always right I guess.

We didnt stop for the summit, the rope stayed tight and we headed straight on down the Gouter Route searching for a bit of man made shelter in the form of a huge mountain hut full of warm beds and hot food.

Ally did make it to Wales a few days later with a massive hangover; the route must have worked though as he doesn’t get in touch much anymore.

 

Mont Blanc - Brouillard Ridge Integral Singlepush

Sunset high up on the Brouillard Ridge to the summit of Mont Blanc. Nice but cold

Mont Blanc - Brouillard Ridge Integral Singlepush

Sunset high up on the Brouillard Ridge to the summit of Mont Blanc. Nice but cold

Mont Blanc - Brouillard Ridge Integral Singlepush

Sunset high up on the Brouillard Ridge to the summit of Mont Blanc. On the left the immense shadows of Mont Blanc itself, our end point, stretches far out in to Italy.

Read more http://alpineexposures.com/euro/mont-blanc-brouillard-ridge-integral

Planning a Rock Climbing Trip

Planning a Rock Climbing Trip

When planning a rock climbing trip the first thing to do is find the right location. For people that have a lesser knowledge of rock climbing it's best to start practicing in an indoor sport climbing facility before going at it alone. The artificial climbing walls and controlled environmental conditions Planning a Rock Climbing Tripallow you to climb on any day. Along with selling top notch sporting equipment, REI has classes for outdoor activities including rock climbing in selected stores and locations across the country. This concept has been popularized by many outdoor gear stores and private gyms.

If going outdoors to do your climbing it's best to start planning a rock climbing trip for a sunny and cool day. Sometimes more experienced climbers take climbs at night. But these types of climbs require more equipment. One of the most amazing rock climbing sites in the US is the Grand Canyon. The most climbed summit in the park is Mount Hayden, which is one of the most often photographed scenes of the park as well. Yosemite is another popular rock climbing destination. Here it's the vertical rock formation El Capitan that has attracted climbers since 1851.

The most important part of planning a rock climbing trip is making sure you have the right equipment. What is essential for any type of climbing is a sturdy helmet. For security while suspended in the air both dynamic and elongation ropes are needed. Other equipment that will keep you safe during rock climbing include webbing, carabiners, harnesses, grip savers, camming devices, nuts, hexes, and climbing shoes.

 

70L Camouflage Tactical Backpack Bag For Hiking Camping Travel Trekking Climbing
$11.99
End Date: Tuesday Aug-16-2016 10:11:38 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $11.99
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

50L Backpack Climbing Travel Waterproof Hiking Internal Frame Packs Rucksack New
$35.79
End Date: Thursday Aug-18-2016 1:22:04 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $35.79
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

 

 

Read more http://www.bittersweetclimbing.com/rock-climbing/planning-a-rock-climbing-trip.html

practical climbing chalk bucket close-up

Note: Somebody is getting a free Practical Chalk Bucket later this month. It could be you. Details coming soon.

Searching For The Perfect Chalk Bucket

Having only seen chalk bags previously, the first time I ever saw a chalk bucket at a climbing gym, I have to admit I thought I was on the set of Honey I Shrunk the Kids. That was years ago and there were no similar surprises when I received a Crosshatch Chalk Bucket from Practical Climbing last week. I was already expecting one of the best chalk buckets available after polling a couple of online forums and having many climbers point me in their direction (Organic, Voodoo, and Dirtbag were also noteworthy contenders). I opened the simple, brown box that Practical Climbing generously sent and it was immediately clear I had received a quality product made by people who care about details.

Need More Grip

Home climbing at my place has ramped up recently having just finished a larger wall and keeping everyone’s hands grippy has been a challenge. Until now I have been satisfied at home, the gym, and outside using standard-sized, behind-the-back chalk bags, but after several sessions with a half dozen or more people constantly searching for a filled chalk bag, or worse, accidentally kicking a side-laying bag across the floor, I decided it was time to do things right and get a proper chalk bucket. I contacted Practical Climbing and they sent me two buckets, one for my home climbing wall, and one for an upcoming give-away (keep your eye on the site and I’ll post some details in the upcoming week).Home Rock Climbing Walls Subscribe

Practical Climbing Crosshatch Chalk Bucket

For a week of almost nightly bouldering sessions, friends and family have been putting the bucket to the test. The first thing I noticed was that nobody was kicking it over even though I had filled it with enough loose chalk to create the equivalent of an indoor Saharan sandstorm. I credit this to the color selected and its sheer size. If you have problems avoiding tripping on objects of this magnitude, climbing really shouldn’t be your thing, or you better have one hell of belayer.

Practical Climbing’s chalk bags and buckets are made in what the husband and wife team describe as their USA workshop. Not only does that sound better than the alternative overseas factory, but the quality is immediately apparent.

practical climbing chalk bucket fullChalk Bucket Observations

The outer fabric is a water resistant, technical nylon fabric that doesn’t have that “you could have made this yourself” look. The zipper to the huge front pocket is a bomber YKK large-tooth design that isn’t going snag in the open position like the one on the Kmart parka I wore in the 4th grade. The pocket is big enough for a brush, tape, toenail clippers, and a reasonably sized sandwich (don’t put the clippers right next to the sandwich–come on that’s gross). There is a large webbing loop up top for hanging the bucket from something, an exterior elastic webbing for holding a brush at the ready, and a paracord drawstring with a sturdy, buttoned tensioner for cinching it shut when not in use. The top rim of the bucket is flashed with a durable, stiff Cordura-like material that visually finishes the design, but also helps the bucket hold its mouth wide open for even the shakiest, pumped hands. The internals are made from recycled materials, nylon lining and soft fleece for the chalk catch. The stitching has a nice contrast of being both hefty and simultaneously stitched with care. I can’t find a single loose thread on either bag I received. The bucket has no stability issues and easily stands upright at 8-9 inches high. Its top chalk opening is similarly 8-9 inches wide.

Observations On Practical Climbing

I suspect Practical Climbing was recommended to me not only because they make great products, but also because they have a good company culture. I don’t know them personally, but it doesn’t take long online to see that they do a lot for the climbing community. They are passionately involved in the sport, they sponsor local climbers, they care about the environment and manufacture responsibly–all that good stuff. They also have an eye for design and creative fabric combinations, so picking out a chalk bag or bucket can be a fun time in itself.

Practical SiteFor me, Practical Climbing will become a good place to grab an affordable, highly unique gift for friends that climb and I fully expect that most of their products could last someone a lifetime. Click here to check out their inventory of chalk bags, buckets, and clothes and to support a climbing business that will love you back.

Upcoming Contest For A Free Practical Climbing Chalk Bucket

I have a second Chalk Bucket ready to give away! Be sure you are subscribed to receive email notifications from this site and like both www.homerockclimbingwalls.com and Practical Climbing on Facebook to get the upcoming details.

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The post Product Review: Practical Climbing Chalk Buckets And Chalk Bags (Upcoming Giveaway) appeared first on Home Rock Climbing Walls.

Read more http://homerockclimbingwalls.com/product-review-practical-climbing-chalk-buckets-chalk-bags/

Rock Climbing Basics

Rock Climbing Basics

Rock climbing offers superb physical and mental benefits. Avid rock climbers usually feel in touch with nature and themselves. With the advent of inside rock gyms and rock walls, the sport is becoming more popular among the masses. However, the sport does impose risks and beginners are Rock Climbing Basicswell advised to learn rock climbing basics.

One of the most important factors for safe climbing is having the right gear. It is essential that beginners learn the proper techniques and climbing knots. Most people benefit from taking a class to teach them the basics to start with. After taking a class, it is advisable for beginners to find an experienced mentor who can really show them the ropes.

One of the most common misconceptions of beginners to the sport is the belief that rock climbing requires super-human upper body strength. While learning rock climbing basics beginners discover that it is actually the legs that propel the rock climber through the course. The hands are primarily used to guide the climber through the course, while offering stability by holding the climber close to the rock face.

Once an interest is developed in the sport, it is important for one to learn the most common mistakes of rock climbers, like backclipping. Avoiding these mistakes can reduce the chance of serious injury in the event of a fall.

Finally, the most important thing that all rock climbers should do is to inspect their gear regularly. A rock climbers gear is a lifeline, so it is essential that it is in good condition.

 

50 ROCK CLIMBING HAND HOLDS. NEW BOLT ONS WITH HARDWARE.
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Red Belay / Rappel Double Slot Device / Outdoor Mountaineering Rock Climbing
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Rock Climbing Training

Rock Climbing Training

For Rock Climbing Training, your back, hips, shoulders, hands, and feet are all muscles that need to be worked and trained for the best flexibility. Your back muscles should be your main concern, along with general muscle balance and endurance. Rock Climbing Training

Stretching and Warming up

Before Rock Climbing Training and before rock climbing itself; it is suggested to stretch and warm up the muscles before hand to avoid injuries. Jogging in place and jumping jacks are both good for warming up.

Push Ups, Pull Ups and Sit Ups

These specific exercises above will strengthen your upper body and your back. Just a couple of these per day is not going to cut it. You will really need to use discipline and do quite a few for Rock Climbing Training.

High Stepping

When I say "high steps" I'm talking about very high steps; such as stepping up on a chair or stool for example. These moves/exercises needs to be repeated a specific amount of reps to strengthen your thigh muscles. This will be working your hamstrings and quadriceps.

Tips For Hand And Finger Muscles

Thick rubber bands will work the fingers and hands. Use these as a resistance when opening up the hand wide. Squeezing tennis balls repeatedly is also excellent for the hand and finger muscles.

Cardio Vascular Endurance

Any kind of cardio or aerobic exercise is excellent for Rock Climbing Training.

Drink Plenty Of Water

Water is the most vital nutrient in your body. It's excellent for building muscle.

 

Metolius Foundry Training Board Black/White Swirl One Size
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rock climbing training hold [revolution]
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Read more http://www.bittersweetclimbing.com/rock-climbing/rock-climbing-training.html

Rock Climbing Walls for Practice

Rock Climbing Walls for Practice

The sport of rock climbing has become a respected and popular method of exercise and recreation. However, it is vital for a climber to develop the necessary skills and physical fitness level to successfully complete this adventure. Rock climbing walls for practice are an excellent approach to Rock Climbing Walls for Practiceachieving all of these goals.

A novice can be placed in a great deal of danger if placed on a rock face with no prior experience. A controlled environment enables the individual to learn the methods and techniques which will produce the best scaling results. This is a leisurely and safer method of familiarizing a person with the lines, techniques, and mental focus necessary to have a successful climb. It also builds the necessary confidence to face the many barriers which can be faced on a rock face without producing panic.

Climbing, is made to look easy by individuals who are experienced in the sport. There is an underlying physical fitness, courage, mental concentration and problem solving which is not evident to most observers. These features of the climb become evident once a person begins to participate in the sport.

Rock climbing walls for practice are also a great way for experienced climbers to develop new skills or hone those that are already in place. These walls can help to maintain the current level of physical fitness when unable to participate in the activity. The sport is sometimes unavailable for an individual due to a number of different weather, social, or personal constraints.

 

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Adam’s trekking poles strike the rocks behind me. My steps fall in line with their metallic rhythm. The trail is relatively flat and wide, testament to its past life as a logging road. With each party of anglers and horse packers and hikers that pass, our confidence swells—we’re hiking in one of the most heavily trafficked areas of the Maroon Bells—Snowmass Wilderness during the most popular season. Solitude here is not easy to come by, but it’s Sunday evening. The forecast is calling for storms. Mother Nature might just be on our side this time.

Read more http://www.sportiva.com/live/live-archive/running-lounge/solitude-in-the-maroon-bells-wilderness

Synrock Climbing Hold ReviewJim B., owner of Synrock climbing holds, is not shy about his claim of climbing hold material superiority. A prominent section of the Synrock website is dedicated to blasting plastic holds, the dominant material used in the industry today–polyurethane usually. Whether you agree with him or not, his conviction is notable and it does translate into quality products.

Synrock Climbing Hold Review

So what are the Synrock holds made of that makes them superior? I have no idea, but it seems like they are probably a secret recipe of high-strength, kiln-fired clay–a distant and more impressive cousin to the ashtray masterpiece you cranked out in 11th grade ceramics class. If correct, the name Synrock (synthetic rock), is really quite fitting.

I received a big package of Synrock holds about a year ago and had ambitions to post about them earlier, but they are so different than anything else on my wall that I wanted to put some miles on them before sharing my opinion. Here is the short of it:

Synrock Climbing Hold ReviewEveryone who climbs my wall comments about them because they stand out immediately as being something different. The first thing climbers notice is that they are cool to the touch. Initially this didn’t sound like an advertisable climbing hold benefit to me, but climbers at my home wall, after thrashing their hands during a long climbing session, will literally go put both hands on a large Synthrock hold just to feel the soothing cold. There is something more natural about the thermodynamics of these holds than their plastic competitors. They are definitely a crowd favorite at my place.

Somehow they are both smooth and grippy simultaneously. Put a smooth round sandstone in the refrigerator for 20 minutes and you’ll have a good idea of how these feel. Also, the Synrock design and manufacturing process allows for some great contrasting textures. Everything from as smooth-as-glass to rough sandstone… all on a single hold. The shapes I received are pretty large and ergonomic for the hands (smooth curves) and the material they are made of allows for some extremely thin edges for feet.

Synrock Climbing Hold ReviewHome climbing wall owners are notoriously on a tight budget and Synrock prices are some of the lowest. Even the shipping ends up favorable thanks to a USPS option they offer which allows them to jam as many holds as will fit in the flat rate boxes.

The holds seriously resist spinning even on my smooth plywood wall. The density of the material is so high that when you tighten the bolt down the pressure is distributed across the entire back of the hold, as opposed to just around the bolt area which creates a pivot point with more flexible hold materials. This distribution of force creates loads of friction and pretty much eliminates the need of a set screw unless you are using a very wide hold as a foot. My climbing gym is in a detached shop that fluctuates in temperature greatly causing the plywood to expand and contract behind my holds. The poly holds, especially large ones, need frequent tightening because of these temp swings, but the Synrock holds have been 99% spin proof over the past year without extra attention.

The bad. They are a heavier and more prone to chipping than most holds of similar sizes. One of mine was chipped in transit. I fixed it with some two-part epoxy and it has held fine. I have no experience with running a commercial gym and suspect that these two issues would cause more problems in those situations than they do for a home gym owner. For home gyms that are primarily bouldering these are largely non-issues. Once on the wall the risk of chipping them is over and as long as you don’t set and reset your wall recklessly it isn’t hard to keep them in good shape. Some might also take issue with the lack of color options that this “more natural” process is capable of–though the black ones are sweet!

I can sum up my experience by saying that I definitely want more Synrock holds on my personal wall. I also, after a lot of time on them, recommend them to home wall builders looking for affordable holds, like a more natural “cooler” feel, and appreciate the handcrafted style.

Synrock Climbing Hold Review
Synrock Climbing Hold Review
Synrock Climbing Hold ReviewSynrock Climbing Hold Review
Synrock Climbing Hold Review
Synrock Climbing Hold Review





 

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We've just returned after 25 days in the Alaskan bush! A float plane took us 100 miles from the nearest road to a blue-green lake then our feet took us through 15 miles of thick forests, rushing waters and sprawling tundra to a base camp beneath a collection of virgin granite peaks. Flying, hiking and climbing in a world of eagles, bears and dall sheep. Gold panning, camping and foraging in a place riddled with minerals, blueberries and mushrooms. Through tremendous effort, we discovered our own version of paradise where peaks remain nameless (except for the ones we made up) and even the USGS maps don't speak the truth.

Read more http://www.sportiva.com/live/live-archive/climbing-archive/the-serendipity-spires

 

Not trying to get too Ninja Warrior or CrossFit here, but a good old rope climb equals some intense exercise and fun in the home climbing gym when your finger tips have been demolished by the plastic. Our home climbing wall ceiling has a 15 foot peak, probably about the minimum for installing one of these, although kids would enjoy any size. I started shopping around online for gym ropes and “fast” ropes and was immediately surprised at the prices: This one for example: 

Crossfit Gym Rope

I found a post on instrucatables.com that showed a simple way to make a fatty gym rope out of a used climbing rope. A few quick inquiries to climbing friends landed a used 60 meter rope in my possession, free of charge. The video above details the steps for those interested in adding one to their home climbing gym. If your climbing area is vertically challenged this would be equally fun in a big tree, just beware that some, especially kids, will expend all of their energy going up and not save anything for the descent or they’ll get scared and freeze at the top, which could lead to dangerous falls. 

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My kids and their friends like climbing and swinging on the rope so much that the climbing wall is not getting as much use as it once was. I’m sure the newness of the rope addition will wear off and things will equalize. The good news is they are pushing themselves and getting stronger. If you make one of these be sure your ceiling structure is strong enough to support it. Spread the load out across as many trusses as you can. 

The post Turn a Used Climbing Rope into a Gym Rope appeared first on Home Rock Climbing Walls.

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Shooting Link Sar over the years has given me an incredible amount of footage from beautiful sunsets to Himalayan storms and everything in-between. Part of the focus of climbing Link Sar, for me, was to make a really beautiful film out of it as there really are very few ‘professional’ grade films that cover technical ascents of unclimbed mountains in the Himalayas- for obvious reasons.

The full feature film will come out in Autumn 2016 but for now here is our 4 mins trailer- it’s definitely worth your time. Hit HD and full screen for the full experience!

 

 

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