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Dynoing Basics with Connor Griffith

Hatun Machay is a remote, high altitude (14,000 ft!) sport climbing, hiking and cultural playground, about two hours outside of Huaraz, Peru. With over 400 bolted routes, and counting, and seemingly unlimited bouldering you could spend weeks there without repeating a climb. The sunrises, sunsets and alpine hiking are stunning enough to attract non-climbers. That […]

The post Climbing Destination: Hatun Machay, Peru appeared first on Crux Crush.

Read more http://cruxcrush.com/2016/07/21/hatun-machay-peru/

Climbing Partner for My Little Girl - Arriving February 2016
Before I begin this post, I would just like to note that the following is a jumble of thoughts from the last few months and may not be coherent whatsoever, especially since I haven’t written anything in a long while and I’m off my writing game. Also, this post has absolutely nothing to do with climbing, but is important to me nonetheless. Proceed with caution… 
 
March 2013 changed my life. That’s when I gave birth to my daughter. We had gone through IVF the previous year to get pregnant, after three years of trying on our own, with no success. So when my daughter arrived, I said “that’s it! I’m done having babies!” I didn’t think I would want to go through the process all over again, and besides, we had a perfect little girl to give our love to already. 
 
But when my baby girl began growing up (as most babies do, unfortunately) my husband and I both started asking ourselves: “do we want our daughter to grow up as an only child? Do we really want to risk heartache and emotional strain to bring another child into the world?”
These questions wouldn’t have even come up, had we not had to decide what to do with the frozen embryos we had stored from our previous IVF cycle. The doctor’s office that stored them sent us a letter in the mail asking if we wanted to renew our contract and keep them frozen. If not, then we would have to fill out paperwork for them to be able to discard the embryos. 
 
So every night, for a few weeks, my husband and I toiled over the decision whether to keep the embryos frozen or not. Even though they were just a few cells at that point, I still felt a connection to them. They were my cells, and I didn’t want to let them go just yet. We ultimately decided that we would renew our contract for another year. Within that year, we would try to get pregnant on our own again, since we had been told lots of women’s bodies reset themselves after giving birth, allowing them to conceive naturally. If not, then we’d at least have a backup plan of trying to get pregnant with the frozen embryos. 
 
Six months went by and nothing. It was like I was reliving my infertility years once again. The disappointment every month was depressing and the hope dwindled. Finally, I told my husband that it was probably time to look into talking with our fertility specialist again to see what  they thought. 
 
It took about another month before we were able to see our specialist. Our initial consultation actually shed some light on the reason we weren’t able to get pregnant in the first place. Apparently, my fallopian tubes did not function the way they should, therefore, the eggs have never been able to make it to where they needed to be. And for years, I was told we had unexplained infertility. Had I known this crucial piece of information from the beginning, we could have been saved ourselves a lot of heartache during the six months we tried on our own. So with that new information, it was easy to make our decision to try a frozen embryo transfer. 
 
However, things didn’t all go exactly as planned. With a Frozen Embryo Transfer (FET), the medications are much less than you would take during an IVF cycle, you have less appointments, and you only have one major procedure (the transfer of the embryo). In my case, I ended up with a cyst in my ovary the first month, which caused a delay for everything else. Then the doctor determined that my lining was too thick, due to my eggs not making it into my uterus to scrape the lining, so he ordered a hysteroscopy with a D&C (which, if you don’t know what that is, is a surgery you have to be out for). And even after the surgery took place, there was some doubt on whether my lining had gotten too thick again. Thankfully, that didn’t happen. 
 
All this kept pushing back the date of transfer and was really wearing on me. Plus, I was taking medications needed to build hormones in my body that would sustain a pregnancy. The pills were easy, it was the injections with long needles that were not fun at all! I had forgotten what an emotional rollercoaster IVF was and this time was no different. I was actually less optimistic this time around because of all the roadblocks we had hit along the way. Surely, they were signs that this FET was doomed from the beginning. 
 
But the transfer day came and went. We decided to take our chances and transfer only one this time around, to prevent a twin pregnancy. That way, if it didn’t take, then we would have one more chance to get pregnant since we had two frozen. 
 
10 days later, we found out we were pregnant. Then we got to see and hear the heartbeat of our little one at 7 weeks, which was music to my ears. After having had some minor bleeding/spotting on some days, it was such a relief to know that our bean was doing well. After my 8 week appointment, I was released to my regular OB for the rest of the pregnancy. I felt like I kicked infertility’s butt for the second time!.  
 
Today's my birthday and I'm just a day shy of 12 weeks. Things are going smoothly now and I couldn’t feel more blessed to be able to go through a second pregnancy. It’s not without its worries, but I’m excited to see what the future holds. My little girl will be a big sister and is extremely excited. If nothing else, I know she’ll have a climbing partner/spotter for the rest of her life.
 
 
 

 

 

Read more http://climbonsister.blogspot.com/2015/08/climbing-partner-for-my-little-girl.html

Crack Climbing TechnCrack Climbing Techniques! Heel-Toe Cam, Arm-Bar/Chicken-Wing, & differnet Hand Stacks

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Dans la traversee deDans la traversee des aiguilles d'Entreve, Chamonix, France

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Day 3 of the @tarakeDay 3 of the @tarakerzhner takeover! Have you ever climbed at Donner Summit’s Snow Shed wall? Here is @emilyaharrington floating Panic in Detroit, 5.12b/c, like it’s 5.9. I guess that’s what happens after you free climb El Capitan in Yosemite where 5.9 can feel like 5.12.

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Dean Potter solo cliDean Potter solo climbing The Deep Blue Sea route on the Eiger and BASEjumps off the top

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If you have never dynoed before, then watching someone explode upwards, fly through the air, and latch the next hold can seem like a miracle and something totally out of your ability level.  However, dynoing, like any other skill in […]

The post Dynoing Basics with Connor Griffith appeared first on Training for Rock Climbing - TrainingBeta.

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Epic climbing view.Epic climbing view.

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escalada en Railay,escalada en Railay, Thailand. Estuve allí hace un par de años y no pude escalar... volveré, es una maravilla!

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