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Rowerowa sztafeta, jakiej jeszcze nie było. Dookoła świata!

Phu lanka Viewpoint,Phayao Thailand.

www.boulderingonline.pl Rock climbing and bouldering pictures and news Phu lanka Viewpoint,Phayao Thailand.
www.boulderingonline.pl Rock climbing and bouldering pictures and news Phu chi fa in Chiang rai,Thailand
If you are looking to improve your route climbing, then building endurance should be one of your top priorities. One of the best ways to do this is through capacity work like ARC training. Doing long duration intervals will help […]
What happens when you don’t live up to your own past performance?
What happens when you get worse instead of getting better or staying the same?
I wrote earlier this year about some of the transition blues I was having after my move to Chicago. I made my goal of 20 days climbing outside this fall, but if you asked me, I would tell you that I had a mediocre season.
I’ve written before about the negative impacts grade-chasing has had on my climbing experience. In July, I was dreaming big and getting disappointed when my expectations didn’t meet reality. This fall, I expected the numbers I was climbing to stay the same, despite drastically reduced training and outdoor time, and the added stress of a move to a new city and a job.
www.boulderingonline.pl Rock climbing and bouldering pictures and news Performance Paradigms
Smith Rock, May 2012, when life was a bit simpler.
Grades are a measure of performance. One measure. The easiest measure, not the only measure, and not the best measure.
I have always had high self-expectations. Myanalyticalself loves grades, precisely because they’re an easy measure of performance. Did I send the grade I wanted to? Am I meeting the expectation I set for myself? These questions become easy to answer when your metric is whether or not you sent a particular grade. A simple metric is attractive, but it causes you to lose sight of the incredible richness of the climbing experience.
To let grades and sending define performance as a climber is to narrow the whole spectrum of climbing experiences to a single binary measure, a black and white vision of success or failure.
As the season wraps, I’m trying to appreciate how I’m growing as a person and as a climber as the result of my experiences, not worry about what grades I’m climbing. Since it seems (to me) to be related, I’ll close this post with this great quote by Alan Watts:
Also, when we are dancing we are not aiming to arrive at a particular place on the floor as in a journey. When we dance, the journey itself is the point, as when we play music the playing itself is the point.

www.boulderingonline.pl Rock climbing and bouldering pictures and news Performance Paradigms
Scott Channing Hall — Out for a drive.Install Theme
www.boulderingonline.pl Rock climbing and bouldering pictures and news Out for a drive.
www.boulderingonline.pl Rock climbing and bouldering pictures and news Osp by Adam Kokot /Osp by Adam Kokot / Adventure Photos, via Flickr
Jan Vopat has had a great week in Kalymnos where he onsighted six routes 8a to Por la socidad con mujeres satisfeches 8b. In the 8a onsight game ranking, the 13 year old is #11. Next year the Czech is old enough to compete in the Youth World Champions.
Adam Ondra is resting for the big push on the 32 pitches of The Dawn Wall, half out of which are 8a+ or harder, including four 8b+'s, one 8c, one 8c+ and two 9a's. What is actually not so well-known is that Tommy Caldwell and Kevin Jorgesson did a team ascent FA, meaning that they just needed to top rope half of the pitches, i.e swing leads. However, as the two 9a's were traverses, both led them and then Jorgesson lead the 8c+ but Caldwell opted for an 8c loop variation. In total, Caldwell and Jorgesson spent 16 days up the 1 000 meter the Dawn Wall to do the first team ascent. Earlier on they had spent six years projecting the line. Adam will not have the benefit of climbing half of the pitches on top rope which makes his ascent harder as most of the time he will be protected only on trad gear. Adam is accompanied by Pavel Blazek who reported on his Instagram three weeks ago: "We both find it quite funny - Adam never really trad climb, I've never been on multipitch climb, neither of us ever had to jug up or set the fix ropes on big wall ... The learning curve is bit steep :) :) :)"
Pavel Blazek reports on Instagram, "As of right now the plan is to go back to the pitch #3 tomorrow - there was some surprisingly hard move - then have two days rest and start the push on Monday." Pavel also says he has a pulled muscle in the back so he is not sure if he can do it without not slowing Adam too much.
Going off route happens to every climber at some point in time. Maybe it’s a sucker hold, tantalizingly chalked but undeniably terrible. You thought the line meandered. It didn’t. Now you’re pumped, tired, holding onto something awful and wondering what’s next. Sometimes, you retreat, back down, regroup, and try again. Sometimes you can’t reverse course, and you’re airborne.
Since I moved to Chicago, I’ve felt like my life is off route. I’m still struggling to find a way to integrate my climbing life with my life-life. I fought all winter to survive, to stay excited about climbing despite a lack of time outdoors, and to fullfill my work obligations in the face of mounting dissatisfaction.
At some point, I stopped working towards my climbing goals.
At some point, I stopped caring that I wasn’t making progress.
At some point, making it to the gym at all became victory, even if I was too tired to train or even climb well.
Before my week long trip in early April, I called home. I was limping through a busy period at work, stressed out of my mind, and worried about my upcoming trip. Idesperatelyneeded climbing to be there for me. I was worried that I wouldn’t enjoy the trip, or climbing itself.
Thankfully, I was wrong. Sanity was temporarily restored. I had an amazing week sleeping burrowed into my sleeping bag (it was cold!), meeting new folks, and steadily destroying my skin. Though I had wandered away from climbing, it was right there waiting for me when I got back.
But it had to end. As I got back to work in Chicago, the same frustrations returned. Logistical issues and the lack of a like-minded consistent climbing partner made the status of future trips uncertain. So for some reason, I stopped writing. I meant to. I knew I ‘should’ write. That I would lose readers if I didn’t. Somehow though, I couldn’t make myself do it.
This post isn’t an apology, only an explanation. I’m trying to find a way to be true to myself and get my life back on route. I’m working on finding ways to be happy in the circumstances I’m stuck with until I can make a move to change them.

www.boulderingonline.pl Rock climbing and bouldering pictures and news Off Route
www.boulderingonline.pl Rock climbing and bouldering pictures and news OA Great Falls Rock Climbing Emily Busch FALL 2016
www.boulderingonline.pl Rock climbing and bouldering pictures and news nubbsgalore: the red eyeshine of the alligator occurs when...
larry lynch
www.boulderingonline.pl Rock climbing and bouldering pictures and news nubbsgalore: the red eyeshine of the alligator occurs when...
david moynahan
www.boulderingonline.pl Rock climbing and bouldering pictures and news nubbsgalore: the red eyeshine of the alligator occurs when...
larry lynch
www.boulderingonline.pl Rock climbing and bouldering pictures and news nubbsgalore: the red eyeshine of the alligator occurs when...
david moynahan
www.boulderingonline.pl Rock climbing and bouldering pictures and news nubbsgalore: the red eyeshine of the alligator occurs when...
larry lynch
the red eyeshine of the alligator occurs when light enters its eyes, passes through the rods (light receptors) and cones (color receptors) of the retina, strikes a membrane behind the retina called a tapeatum, and is then reflected back through the eye to the light source.most of the animals with eyeshine are, like alligators, night hunters who must make use of limited light.photos by larrylynchand david moynahan
Description:
Description:
NO CODES follows Phillipe Ribière’s development of a new climbing area in Ardèche, France. Climbing amid the raw beauty of the French forest, you’ll notice that Phillipe isn’twhat you’d expect of a world-class boulderer. He was born with a handicap, previously diagnosed as Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. Phillipe explains that today it’s considered “something else, a mutated form waiting to be confirmed by official analysis.”
In this clip, you’ll be inspired by Phillipe’s impressive climbing talent and his passionate dedication to living a life beyond his handicap.

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www.boulderingonline.pl Rock climbing and bouldering pictures and news NIGHT CLIMBING, THENIGHT CLIMBING, THE WEALD, ENGLAND
Awesome! Thanks for the kind words.
I come from a country deeply affected by racial and religious hatred, violence, and poverty. Although I have been lucky not to experience war firsthand, the same cannot be said for the generation of my parents, and grandparents.I don’t remember the aftermath of the tragic events that shook my country. I remember that the ration stamps were taken out of circulation when I was three, and that a few years later my mother and I were able to obtain passports.
www.boulderingonline.pl Rock climbing and bouldering pictures and news mu-neutrino: Turner’s Flake (5.8)